Planting Seeds - Food & Farming News from CDFA

Beneficial wasps released in Southern California to help reduce Asian Citrus Psyllid populations – from CBS-2 Los Angeles

Tamarixia radiata, a tiny stingless wasp utilized in the Asian citrus psyllid program

NoteCDFA releases approximately 100,000 stingless parasitic wasps each week in areas of California with high populations of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, an invasive species that spreads huanglongbing, or citrus greening, a disease that is fatal to citrus trees.

Thousands of tiny, parasitic wasps were released across Southern California (last) week – but officials say they are beneficial bugs that will reduce a pest spreading a disease that’s killing the region’s citrus trees.

Thousands of tiny, parasitic wasps were released across Southern California (last) week – but officials say they are beneficial bugs that will reduce a pest spreading a disease that’s killing the region’s citrus trees.

Trees with Huanglongbing, also known as HLB, have been found more than 2,000 residential citrus trees in northern Orange County cities, Long Beach, eastern Los Angeles County, and Riverside County, according to UC Riverside’s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The disease has not been detected in Ventura County, but several Asian citrus psyllid, also known as ACP, have been collected there.

Officials say the wasps, which are a natural predator of ACP, were released periodically (last) week. Citrus tree owners were urged to place ant bait around citrus trees to reduce ants, which can interfere with beneficial insects like Tamaraxia, and protect harmful pests like the ACP.

See the story here: https://cbsloc.al/3bQ3H5T

Learn more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and huanglongbing.

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